44211/4520 approaches Killawarra in 2010

44211/4520 approaches Killawarra in 2010

Sunday, 10 November 2013

44237

Hi Guy's

I have just finished this Austrains 44237. I have had this one sitting around for a long time in various stages of work. But I had a few of these Jumbo's on the bench so I decided to bite the bullet and finish it off. This was a major detailing job similar to my 8002 that I have Blogged previously. I am not going to go into this detailing. My main aim of this Blog is to show it off.

I have detailed this jumbo up to a reasonable standard. There are other things that I could of done but there is a point that I have to stop or I will never get anything finished. Here is a bit of a Photographic essay of the work done to this loco.
I realised I made a mistake here. I did both pilots the same. The pipe work at the top of the pilot is a mirror image on the other end of the loco as the pipes only run down one side of the loco. When I do the next Jumbo I will do them the other way around and swap one pilot of this loco
Some pipe detail on the bogies. On my 8002 project I cut up parts of the bogies so that I could get all the wheel Journals in the right locations. I haven't done that with this one and that will bug me for a while. I may have to revisit this at a later date as I now have many spare side frames to play around with. So the fact that there is 2 Speedo locations on the bogie will get fixed one day.
The pilot fitted with KD 58 Couplers. For the Paintwork on this Loco, I resprayed the Red with a coat of light Grey. I let it harden for a couple of weeks then sprayed a faded coat of Railey's Candy Red with a little bit of Floquil Grime mixed it. I then went about lightly sanding the paint to try and give the effect of years of steam cleaning on the paint. Areas that I wasn't happy I went over with some of the light grey with a brush.
This was the result of the sanding back
 
For the staff exchangers I used ILM 80 class exchangers. The Jumbo Staff Exchanger Pocket is a bit wider then the 80 class so I widened the Exchanger to suit as seen in these pictures
 
 
This picture was the loco at the stage of decaling and finishing off the weathering
Most the detailing work was done. There was just the hand rail and grab iron detail to add.
 
This is the finished product. I will go into more detail when I do some more Jumbo's. I have put cab interior detail in this Jumbo. I used some spare parts from an Auscision 422 class that I had lying around for the interior. I will need to construct interiors on future models and also the update the 3 other Jumbo's that I have running so I will detail this work then.
 
 
On the number 2 end there is no crew and the blinds are pulled most of the way down. In the early 90's there was a ban on Jumbo's leading by the number 2 end.
 
A coupe of the Prototype thanks to Dave Porter
 
 
 
 
One to finish off
 
 
Cheers Justin Moy
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

9 comments:

  1. Nice work Justin, just as I remember them from my chasing days. Darren

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  2. Hi Justin,

    Fantastic work as usual. How have you achieved the faded appearance of the paintwork on the tuscan 80 class?

    Cheers, Jamie

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  3. Hi Jamie, I resprayed the Tuscan on this Loco with Railey Paints Tuscan. I mixed a little bit of Floquil Paints Dust to lighten the Paint and therefore give a faded appearance. It was a large masking job and I have gone to a bit of detail about this is a previous Blog. I think it was called ( The Making of 8002 ) Cheers Justin

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    1. Hi Justin, Many thanks for your response. Please keep the pictures of your new work coming - they're very inspirational! Cheers, Jamie

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  4. You've captured that faded look really well. The extra work on the bogies is definitely worth the effort!
    Is a "44" essentially an SAR 700 class?

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    1. Hi Ian, Sorry for the slow reply, I didn't realise that you were asking a question. The NSW 442 class is basically the same as the SAR 700 class. I am not sure which ones were built first. The only real variations are based around the safe working systems for each state with the different locations of the staff exchangers. Mostly the 700's have worked on broad Gauge.

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  5. Looks great, Justin.
    What camera are you using for your photos? Nice depth of field...
    James

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    1. Hi James, Every model shot I take is done using the maximum Depth of field that is available with the lens that I use. This is the largest F/Stop Available. In this case I was using my Pentax DA 16-45mm Lens which has F22 available. This lens has a limited Macro Ability, but is more than good enough for a Loco shot. Another trick is with the focusing. To get the most in focus you need to focus about a 1/3rd of the way down the model. If I focused on the front of the loco I would never get any of the back in focus. I find it easy to do as I was originally trained as a scientific Photographer with the CSIRO. Cheers Justin Moy

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  6. Hi Justin, I have a heap of wagons I would like to get weathered if you are interested? Can you please get in touch with me via email at tomplayf1@gmail.com and i will flick you a list of what i have. Also how much would it cost to have a couple of austrains 80's superdetailad and weathered as per your earlier post?

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